Healthy Beginnings

Illuminology: The Benefits of Light Therapy

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Light emitting diodes have been scientifically proven to stimulate cells for collagen production via mitochondrial (ATP) production, hair loss, pain relief, and bone and nerve regeneration. Current trends also tout skin renewal, from age spot lightening to softening wrinkles to fat reduction.

Photon therapy makes a much safer alternative to Botox injections for wrinkles. Photobiomodulation is the application of light that has been noted for ATP (mitochondrial production), cellular stimulation and neuro-restorative therapy.

NASA spent billions on specific light frequencies (biotechnology) to grow plants without the natural UV (ultra violet), infrared light and heat from the sun. They found
that 670nm (nanometer) red, 470nm blue and near infrared wavelengths replicated photosynthesis artificially. Many of the scientists reported benefits such as skin renewal, weight loss, hair regrowth, and pain and/or stress relief.

Red lasers are commonly used for restoring hair. The 670nm red is the magical frequency noted in medical studies and used by many devices. Lasers have been used for acupuncture to stimulate immunity, enhance energy and reduce fat cells. Working on only one meridian to stimulate immune function makes sense. But why not treat the entire body with light to target its entirety?

Blue lights are reported to help with fatigue, pain, relaxation as well as photo facial for darker skin types.

Near infrared light waves are proven to aid in circulation and metabolism, and are also proven to prevent neurotoxicity.

The National Library of Medicine has more than 26 million citations for biomedical and life sciences studies. A public collective collaboration to help guide physicians to research conditions as well as other applications is and has been at our fingertips. Above all, positive results may be only a potential for some.

For more information, call Diane Underwood, Reverse Aging Energy Spa, at 775-233-4878.

References:

  1. nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/385.html
  2. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=16464535