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Why Good Teeth Go Bad

(Part One)
By Tom Cornwell
A little over thirty years ago Robert O. Nara embarked on a course in his dental career which would ultimately cost him his license to practice dentistry. That, in turn, led to his publishing two books; Money by the Mouthful – What you should know about the health of your mouth and body that no doctor is going to tell you! followed by How to Become Dentally Self Sufficient. To say that he ruffled a few feathers in the dental community would be an understatement. To say that the cat was out of the bag would be more accurate. Fortunately, his unorthodox message of dental prevention and self-healing caught a lot of attention beyond the northern regions of Michigan.
The most significant things one might cull from Dr. Nara’s work is the observation that there were 7 factors or principles at play in keeping one’s teeth and keeping them healthy for life. Based on his last lecture while working with the National Health Federation, Bob had revealed these factors, which he says took him the better part of a year to distill. Contrary to popular (and professional) belief, one never had to lose a tooth or suffer any type of gum decay due to disease – it was all preventable and for the most part, reversible. Imagine that: One could reverse tooth decay and gum disease!  It certainly made sense if one considered the healing abilities of the rest of the body. The question is, why did we never before really consider this inherent ability?
That question led to one of Dr. Nara’s first factors:  ‘Frame of Reference.’  With the ‘frame of reference’ or perception we had about dental disease and dentistry in general, we were doomed to ‘brushing twice a day, avoiding sweets and visiting the dentist twice a year.’  That was it. That was the best we could do and yet even today periodontal disease is considered an epidemic.
Bob Nara wrote that if we took a look at the nature of the disease, understood the cause and cure and adjusted our hygiene and eating habits accordingly, the last thing we should ever have to worry about was a lifetime of expensive and painful dental work. The key is understanding and changing the perception of our oral environment.
“There are all kinds of research studies that show that seeing the dentist twice a year doesn’t lower the incidence of dental disease. …it’s not a preventive thing at all. If you go there and have your teeth scraped, x-rays taken and a few other things, that’s really not a preventive service, it’s preventing nothing. It may be catching up with all of the bad things that have happened, but it prevents nothing. In fact, Health and Human Services data shows that at age 65, blacks and whites in this country have the same number of missing teeth. At age 65, however, the white segment has about seven times more fillings than the blacks and across the board spends about 20 times more money in a lifetime. But at 65 they have the same number of missing teeth, what does that tell you? That means that they’re not getting a whole lot for their 20-times-more-money and those seven-times-more-fillings – really don’t keep those teeth lasting any longer. This isn’t your fault, by the way. This is the fault of the dental profession.”
In future articles we will take a look at six other factors in keeping the teeth and gums healthy, including nutrition, and why even the healthiest vegan or raw food diets will often lead to poor oral health.
Reference:
The Seven Factors Transcript from Dr. Nara’s speech to the National Health Federation, 1986.
For more info, contact Tom Cornwell at www.Mizar5.com.

why-good-teeth-go-bad-300(Part One)

By Tom Cornwell |

A little over thirty years ago Robert O. Nara embarked on a course in his dental career which would ultimately cost him his license to practice dentistry. That, in turn, led to his publishing two books; Money by the Mouthful – What you should know about the health of your mouth and body that no doctor is going to tell you! followed by How to Become Dentally Self Sufficient. To say that he ruffled a few feathers in the dental community would be an understatement. To say that the cat was out of the bag would be more accurate. Fortunately, his unorthodox message of dental prevention and self-healing caught a lot of attention beyond the northern regions of Michigan.

The most significant things one might cull from Dr. Nara’s work is the observation that there were 7 factors or principles at play in keeping one’s teeth and keeping them healthy for life. Based on his last lecture while working with the National Health Federation, Bob had revealed these factors, which he says took him the better part of a year to distill. Contrary to popular (and professional) belief, one never had to lose a tooth or suffer any type of gum decay due to disease – it was all preventable and for the most part, reversible. Imagine that: One could reverse tooth decay and gum disease!  It certainly made sense if one considered the healing abilities of the rest of the body. The question is, why did we never before really consider this inherent ability?

That question led to one of Dr. Nara’s first factors:  ‘Frame of Reference.’  With the ‘frame of reference’ or perception we had about dental disease and dentistry in general, we were doomed to ‘brushing twice a day, avoiding sweets and visiting the dentist twice a year.’  That was it. That was the best we could do and yet even today periodontal disease is considered an epidemic.

Bob Nara wrote that if we took a look at the nature of the disease, understood the cause and cure and adjusted our hygiene and eating habits accordingly, the last thing we should ever have to worry about was a lifetime of expensive and painful dental work. The key is understanding and changing the perception of our oral environment.

“There are all kinds of research studies that show that seeing the dentist twice a year doesn’t lower the incidence of dental disease. …it’s not a preventive thing at all. If you go there and have your teeth scraped, x-rays taken and a few other things, that’s really not a preventive service, it’s preventing nothing. It may be catching up with all of the bad things that have happened, but it prevents nothing. In fact, Health and Human Services data shows that at age 65, blacks and whites in this country have the same number of missing teeth. At age 65, however, the white segment has about seven times more fillings than the blacks and across the board spends about 20 times more money in a lifetime. But at 65 they have the same number of missing teeth, what does that tell you? That means that they’re not getting a whole lot for their 20-times-more-money and those seven-times-more-fillings – really don’t keep those teeth lasting any longer. This isn’t your fault, by the way. This is the fault of the dental profession.”

In future articles we will take a look at six other factors in keeping the teeth and gums healthy, including nutrition, and why even the healthiest vegan or raw food diets will often lead to poor oral health.

Reference:

The Seven Factors Transcript from Dr. Nara’s speech to the National Health Federation, 1986.

For more info, contact Tom Cornwell at www.Mizar5.com.