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Toxins in Deodorants

Written by Rita Shurtliff
There are many personal care products including deodorants and antiperspirants on the shelves today. The trend is to make deodorants and antiperspirants that smell like perfume. Have you ever considered what makes up the gel or white colored paste we slather under our arms to stay fresh and sweat free?  Remember the commercial “Never let them see you sweat;” sweating is actually very healthy for you. It is our body’s way of getting rid of unwanted toxins. Toxins are also known as chemicals in body waste, and the by-product that is produced when organs metabolize what is ingested or topically applied.
Unfortunately all products are not created equal and many health and beauty items are full of toxic ingredients. Some of the most common ingredients found in deodorants and antiperspirants are: parabens, zirconium and aluminum.
Over the last eight years, several research studies have shown that various types of parabens act like estrogen when introduced to animal tissue cultures. Estrogen has been known to drive the growth of cancer cells.
Research at Reading University has suggested there may be a link between the increase in breast cancer in the last 25 years which coincides with the introduction of antiperspirants. Breast cancer tumors in men and women tend to occur in the upper-outer section of the left breast, which could be because right-handed people apply more deodorant into their left armpit.
Some researchers think that by preventing sweating, you block the excretion of toxins which can build up in the lymph glands. Zirconium and aluminum in antiperspirants have also been found to enter cells and mutate DNA, which may lead to cancerous growth as well as disrupt hormone levels.
In addition to the above mentioned ingredients, there are several other ingredients that are not listed on deodorant and antiperspirant labels. Fragrances and or scents for instance; are they synthetic or are they natural oils?  Over the past decades more fragrances have been added to deodorants and antiperspirants. The scent of spice, the great outdoors, and lavender, to mention a few, may enhance the smell of deodorants but do they contribute to the effectiveness of the product?  Are they toxic to our health?
There is of course a natural route; mineral salts have proven to be effective in stopping body odor and have been used to eliminate unpleasant body odor dating back to ancient civilizations. Mineral stones are available today in sprays, gels and bars.
Look for other “safe” choices, such as: deodorants made with vegetable glycerin, lichen, herbs or herbal extracts, de-ionized water or distilled water, green tea, aloe Vera, baking soda and essential oils. All of these ingredients may be found in stick, spray or in a roll on format.
Remember, good health is a result of choice – choose wisely!
References:
1. Top 7 Ingredients to Avoid by Dr. Christine H. Farlow, D.C. “The Ingredients Investigator.” Dr. Farlow has been researching ingredient safety since 1991.
2. EPA & FDA Websites: Dr Samuel Epstein, University of Illinois, Chicago; Philippa Darbre, Journal of Applied Toxicology.
For more info, contact NatureRich at (775) 331-6490, specializing in mineral-based, pH balanced products.

toxins_in_deodorants-300Written by Rita Shurtliff |

There are many personal care products including deodorants and antiperspirants on the shelves today. The trend is to make deodorants and antiperspirants that smell like perfume. Have you ever considered what makes up the gel or white colored paste we slather under our arms to stay fresh and sweat free?  Remember the commercial “Never let them see you sweat;” sweating is actually very healthy for you. It is our body’s way of getting rid of unwanted toxins. Toxins are also known as chemicals in body waste, and the by-product that is produced when organs metabolize what is ingested or topically applied.

Unfortunately all products are not created equal and many health and beauty items are full of toxic ingredients. Some of the most common ingredients found in deodorants and antiperspirants are: parabens, zirconium and aluminum.

Over the last eight years, several research studies have shown that various types of parabens act like estrogen when introduced to animal tissue cultures. Estrogen has been known to drive the growth of cancer cells.

Research at Reading University has suggested there may be a link between the increase in breast cancer in the last 25 years which coincides with the introduction of antiperspirants. Breast cancer tumors in men and women tend to occur in the upper-outer section of the left breast, which could be because right-handed people apply more deodorant into their left armpit.

Some researchers think that by preventing sweating, you block the excretion of toxins which can build up in the lymph glands. Zirconium and aluminum in antiperspirants have also been found to enter cells and mutate DNA, which may lead to cancerous growth as well as disrupt hormone levels.

In addition to the above mentioned ingredients, there are several other ingredients that are not listed on deodorant and antiperspirant labels. Fragrances and or scents for instance; are they synthetic or are they natural oils?  Over the past decades more fragrances have been added to deodorants and antiperspirants. The scent of spice, the great outdoors, and lavender, to mention a few, may enhance the smell of deodorants but do they contribute to the effectiveness of the product? Are they toxic to our health?

There is of course a natural route; mineral salts have proven to be effective in stopping body odor and have been used to eliminate unpleasant body odor dating back to ancient civilizations. Mineral stones are available today in sprays, gels and bars.

Look for other “safe” choices, such as: deodorants made with vegetable glycerin, lichen, herbs or herbal extracts, de-ionized water or distilled water, green tea, aloe Vera, baking soda and essential oils. All of these ingredients may be found in stick, spray or in a roll on format.

Remember, good health is a result of choice – choose wisely!

References:

1. Top 7 Ingredients to Avoid by Dr. Christine H. Farlow, D.C. “The Ingredients Investigator.” Dr. Farlow has been researching ingredient safety since 1991.

2. EPA & FDA Websites: Dr Samuel Epstein, University of Illinois, Chicago; Philippa Darbre, Journal of Applied Toxicology.

For more info, contact NatureRich at (775) 331-6490, specializing in mineral-based, pH balanced products.