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Medical Thermography – A Modern Alternative

If you have concerns about breast health and are looking for alternatives, consider medical thermography, a non-invasive, FDA approved Infrared Thermal Breast screening. The following information may help you choose a qualified and state-of-the-art clinic for this procedure:
1. Cost per procedure: between $150 and $250, including thermograph and report. Check with your insurance regarding coverage.
2. Good candidates for medical breast thermography: People (men, women or children) of any age who wish to avoid x-rays, especially people with implants, prior mastectomies or current breast cancer.
3. Who will interpret and approve your thermograph and report: A thermographer should read and interpret the thermogram (infrared image); she/he should be a certified and experienced thermographer, trained in the reading and explanation of thermograms. She/he will report his/her findings in writing.
A medical doctor (MD or DO) should review, approve and sign the written thermogram report; she/he should have oncology training and experience.
4. Patient prerequisites – how to prepare: To receive the highest quality thermal imaging of the breasts and the greatest degree of accuracy in imaging, it is critical that patients follow careful instructions from the clinic before their exam. Be sure that you contact them at least 2 weeks prior to your procedure to get specific information.
5. Clinic standards: The thermal lab must be temperature controlled, 68° to 72° F. * Artifact-free environment, i.e., nothing on the walls or in the room that can or may produce thermal artifacts from non-patient radiated sources, e.g., mirrors, stainless steel furniture, framed glass/ plexi-glass pictures, heat lamps, or equipment that emits significant heat. * The laboratory facility should be private, clean, medically professional and a pleasant, calm atmosphere. * The facility should be used only for medical breast thermography.
6. Technology does make a difference: The imaging equipment should be state of the art, e.g., Fluke infrared TI55-FT or equivalent; fully radiometric infrared (measures actual temperature or every pixel, not just a range of heat/temperature); * 320 x 240 pixels resolution or higher. * Temperature range: -32° C to 600° C, ± 0.05 degrees C  (this will yield a very high accuracy level); * Wave-length 7.5 to 14 µ. (The human body emits radiation wave lengths at 12 µ; the above range is an industry standard and is perfect for medical imaging.)
7. Thermographer qualifications: Ask to see certifications and samples of complete reports. Use your common sense; more years of experience in medical and breast thermography are better.
Reference:
www.breastthermography.com
For more info contact ThermaDiagnostics at (775) 356-0200 or (775) 826-1200; visit the website at www.thermadiagnostics.com.

If you have concerns about breast health and are looking for alternatives, consider medical thermography, a non-invasive, FDA approved Infrared Thermal Breast screening. The following information may help you choose a qualified and state-of-the-art clinic for this procedure:

1. Cost per procedure: between $150 and $250, including thermograph and report. Check with your insurance regarding coverage.

2. Good candidates for medical breast thermography: People (men, women or children) of any age who wish to avoid x-rays, especially people with implants, prior mastectomies or current breast cancer.

3. Who will interpret and approve your thermograph and report: A thermographer should read and interpret the thermogram (infrared image); she/he should be a certified and experienced thermographer, trained in the reading and explanation of thermograms. She/he will report his/her findings in writing.

A medical doctor (MD or DO) should review, approve and sign the written thermogram report; she/he should have oncology training and experience.

4. Patient prerequisites – how to prepare: To receive the highest quality thermal imaging of the breasts and the greatest degree of accuracy in imaging, it is critical that patients follow careful instructions from the clinic before their exam. Be sure that you contact them at least 2 weeks prior to your procedure to get specific information.

5. Clinic standards: The thermal lab must be temperature controlled, 68° to 72° F. * Artifact-free environment, i.e., nothing on the walls or in the room that can or may produce thermal artifacts from non-patient radiated sources, e.g., mirrors, stainless steel furniture, framed glass/ plexi-glass pictures, heat lamps, or equipment that emits significant heat. * The laboratory facility should be private, clean, medically professional and a pleasant, calm atmosphere. * The facility should be used only for medical breast thermography.

6. Technology does make a difference: The imaging equipment should be state of the art, e.g., Fluke infrared TI55-FT or equivalent; fully radiometric infrared (measures actual temperature or every pixel, not just a range of heat/temperature); * 320 x 240 pixels resolution or higher. * Temperature range: -32° C to 600° C, ± 0.05 degrees C  (this will yield a very high accuracy level); * Wave-length 7.5 to 14 µ. (The human body emits radiation wave lengths at 12 µ; the above range is an industry standard and is perfect for medical imaging.)

7. Thermographer qualifications: Ask to see certifications and samples of complete reports. Use your common sense; more years of experience in medical and breast thermography are better.

Reference:

www.breastthermography.com

For more info contact ThermaDiagnostics at (775) 356-0200 or (775) 826-1200; visit the website at www.thermadiagnostics.com.