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Household Energy
Americans spend more than $160 billion a year to heat, cool, light and live in their homes, and this energy bill continues to grow. Houses use about 21 percent of the energy used in the US each year, consume a significant amount of electricity and natural gas, and contribute to 17 percent of national greenhouse gas emissions. While our homes are more efficient today than they were 30 years ago, considerable opportunity
remains for greater home energy efficiency and the associated benefits.
When the need to conserve energy in your house is considered, then the focus should be mainly on heating and cooling processes. They are the major uses of energy. Hot water heating is also a sizable use of energy, as is the cooking process with surface unit and oven. Refrigerators and lighting use a significant amount of energy.
The price of power per kilowatt-hour has gone from an average of 2 cents to 10 cents over the past 40 years. Many households could save 20 to 30 percent on their household energy bills through cost-effective household improvements such as buying more energy-efficient products and appliances, sealing air and duct leaks, and adding insulation.
References:
1. http://www.energysavers.gov/phee.html
2. http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/thermo/houseenergy.html
For more info, contact Scott W Albrecht, specializing in Indoor Air Quality and Home Energy Consulting at
Preferred Ecosystems, at (775) 626-6800 or 4usa@ecoquestintl.com.

high-prices-household-energy-300Household Energy

Americans spend more than $160 billion a year to heat, cool, light and live in their homes, and this energy bill continues to grow. Houses use about 21 percent of the energy used in the US each year, consume a significant amount of electricity and natural gas, and contribute to 17 percent of national greenhouse gas emissions. While our homes are more efficient today than they were 30 years ago, considerable opportunity remains for greater home energy efficiency and the associated benefits.

When the need to conserve energy in your house is considered, then the focus should be mainly on heating and cooling processes. They are the major uses of energy. Hot water heating is also a sizable use of energy, as is the cooking process with surface unit and oven. Refrigerators and lighting use a significant amount of energy.

The price of power per kilowatt-hour has gone from an average of 2 cents to 10 cents over the past 40 years. Many households could save 20 to 30 percent on their household energy bills through cost-effective household improvements such as buying more energy-efficient products and appliances, sealing air and duct leaks, and adding insulation.

References:

1. http://www.energysavers.gov/phee.html

2. http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/Hbase/thermo/houseenergy.html

For more info, contact Scott W Albrecht, specializing in Indoor Air Quality and Home Energy Consulting at

Preferred Ecosystems, at (775) 626-6800 or 4usa@ecoquestintl.com.