Healthy Beginnings

DID YOU KNOW?

SoyProducts-300SOY IS NOT AS HEALTHY AS YOU THINK

For many years now we’ve all heard and read stories about the health benefits of soy. In fact, soy may not be as healthy as you thought:

• Unless fermented, soy blocks the absorption of important nutrients consumed along with it. Soy protein, soy milk, soy cheese, etc. are not fermented.

• Because soy has natural plant estrogens, it can have unwanted hormonal effects on men and pre-menopausal women.

• Asians, often cited as examples of health (a whole other issue), eat far less tofu and other soy products than is commonly thought in the West.

• Soy is one of the top 8 allergens.

• Soy can impair fertility in both men and women.

There are forms of soy that don’t have as many of these problems – miso, natto and tempeh are all forms of fermented soy. Even so, it is best to eat these in moderation.

REGULAR EXERCISE BOOSTS METABOLISM

In fact, you can boost your metabolism with only 30 minutes of exercise a day. Unfortunately, not all of us have the time and inclination to exercise as regularly as we should. Even so, there is a way to get all the health benefits exercise brings you without having to carve a half hour out of your day.

How? By exercising in short, 10-minute bouts of vigorous exercise several times during the day. In fact, some studies show that 2 or 3 such active sessions a day are actually more effective at stimulating your metabolism than one single longer exercise period.

ANTIOXIDANTS ARE INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED FOR THEIR IMPORTANCE IN DIET

Chris Pritsos, Nutrition Department Chair of the University of Nevada, Reno, recently sat at a round table discussion at the University of Oxford in England to discuss the benefits of antioxidants. Pritsos researches cancer, the role of antioxidants and the effects of second-hand smoke.

Pritsos, one of only 50 experts to sit on the panel, shared his knowledge about the role and importance of low-dose antioxidant supplements, specifically vitamins C and E, in helping to prevent disease.

According to Pritsos, most Americans do not receive adequate amounts of antioxidants in their diet. The purpose of the panel was to discuss how to incorporate new information about nutrition to public policy.
Information from Nevada Insights Magazine, Vo. 4 2006