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A Sexy Smile

By Michael Gerber, MD, HMD
A great smile is a wonderful, attractive beginning for human contact and sexuality. But behind the smile, the health of our teeth can have vast repercussions on our sexuality and the health of our reproductive organs. Teeth that have been neglected or improperly treated, or bad breath caused by bacteria, can certainly be unattractive and indicate poor vitality and specific illnesses.
The body’s vital force (also referred to as orgone, energy, chi, prana, etc.) and all aspects of our being and health are reflected in the teeth. So emotional well-being, good pelvic orgasmic energy, circulation, hormonal balance, nutritional supplementation and oral hygiene are interrelated factors. And with aging or a loss of vitality, the teeth and all their structures can go downhill quickly.
German doctors in the last century developed a theory that certain teeth relate to specific diseases, meridians, organs, hormones, spinal segments, joints, muscles, sense organs, etc. Similar “body maps” have been identified in other systems of medicine. For example, reflexology points for the entire body are found in the hands, feet and ears; acupuncture meridians also map out energy channels that relate to various organ systems; and nerve pathways from the spine create communication links throughout the body. Such energetic connections definitely include and affect sexuality. Drs. Voll, Kramer, Adler,
Gleditch, Rau and others found similar relationships and body maps in the mouth. These researchers developed charts to help practitioners relate dental disease to distant sites in the body. Many patients with cancers or other diseases of the reproductive organs, genital tract or breast have had decay, disease or root canals in corresponding teeth.
Symptoms of dental disease are headaches, neurological disorders (numbness, tingling, electrical currents in the face, head or extremities, visual disturbances), chronic sinus infections, facial pain (trigeminal neuralgia—tic douloureux), heart irregularities, panic, anxiety, depression, joint pain and most commonly, chronic fatigue—send a severe blow to the libido. No one is sexy when exhausted and the kidney/adrenal chi (energy) is gone.
Developing that Hollywood Smile
Diet is an important factor in an appealing smile. Weston Price, DDS, conducted a dental study at the beginning of the last century on the effect of diet. He visited aboriginal people, photographed their dental arches and noted their rate of tooth decay before and after going off their native diet and consuming refined foods and sugars. After two generations, the dental arch went from very wide jaws with perfect tooth alignment to narrow jaws with an awful array of crooked teeth. Decay rate went from one cavity for every 10 people to 10 cavities per person.
Nutrition also has a serious impact on the health of the gums and on the pleasantness of the breath. Bad breath has broken up many relationships and stopped others from ever getting started. It is a complex problem and can arise from several sources.
Chronically constipated people with leaky gut syndrome often have a strong fecal smell, which comes from the lungs. Streptococcusfecalis (which smells fecal) can also grow in the mouth. Infected gums and other periodontal illnesses are very common, especially with aging. Pockets and crypts that develop next to the teeth need attention before loss of teeth or bone
occurs or extensive surgery and bone grafts become necessary.
Two-time Nobel Prize winner Dr. Linus Pauling felt that most humans suffer from sub-clinical scurvy. Scurvy (severe vitamin C deficiency) used to claim the lives of sailors on long voyages and Northern Europeans at the end of winter when fresh food ran out. Humans, primates and guinea pigs are the only animals that don’t make vitamin C in their liver:  A 150 pound goat makes about 14,000 mg. of vitamin C every day. The first symptoms of scurvy are bleeding and receding gums and loose teeth, which eventually fall out if not treated. Vitamin C is very important for connective tissue and maintaining strong capillary structure. Many doctors suggest patients take at least 5,000 mg of buffered vitamin C per day, a dose which heals numerous periodontal problems.
The father of Orthomolecular Psychiatry, Abram Hoffer, M.D., of Victoria, Canada, has researched many important uses of niacin (vitamin B3)—including the treatment of periodontal disease. Lack of sufficient niacin causes red blood cells to become stiff and inflexible. Capillaries, the body’s smallest blood vessels, are a third the size of the red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the tissues of the body. Adequate amounts of niacin assure red blood cell flexibility to let them fold into the capillaries and allow gum tissue to be oxygenated and repair normally. For people with deep pockets next to the teeth, treatment with a Water Pik with one drop of Citrotida P (grapefruit seed extract) in the reservoir helps to reduce infection and encourage healing. Vigorous brushing, good mineral intake and avoidance of sugar can all help to eliminate pockets that eventually cause loss of teeth and ongoing halitosis.
Most people faced with the prospect of straightening their smile are unaware that there are important choices in methods. Regular orthodontia—which waits until the child’s jaw has mostly matured and uses fixed bands and nickel-titanium wires to pull the teeth into position—can have many drawbacks. The bicuspid teeth are frequently removed to allow space for the teeth to be pulled into alignment, which can cause the jaw to collapse in later life. The torsion of the pull on the jaw can put unnatural stress on the head bones and cause headaches and personality changes. This method sets up strong electrical currents in the mouth, sometimes causing severe behavioral changes.
George Crozat, D.D.S., a New Orleans dentist who did most of his work from the 1920s – 1960s, developed a method of orthodontia that was much more connected to orthopedics (bone development). It uses a non-force technique in which gold wires of complex shapes are looped around the teeth to encourage the body to adopt new jaw alignment gently and gradually. He started the process much earlier in children, around the age of five or six, and widened the dental arch and jaw first to allow the teeth room to fit without removing them. Although it takes about a third longer than regular orthodontia, this method supports the lips and gives a beautiful Hollywood smile. It also can widen the dental arch of adults, which is generally not thought possible. The procedure requires extensive training and skill, but it is very worthwhile to find a dentist who can do it.
References:
1. George Meinig, DDS, Root Canal Cover-Up, 1993
2. Weston Price, DDS, The Price of Root Canals, 1994
3. Hal Huggins, DDS, It’s All In Your Head, 1985
4. Dietrich Klinghardt, MPH, PhD, Neural Therapy J Neurol Orthop. Med Surg 1993;14:109–14.
For more info, contact The Gerber Medical Clinic at 775-826-1900 or inge@gerbermedical.com.

a-sexy-smile-300By Michael Gerber, MD, HMD |

A great smile is a wonderful, attractive beginning for human contact and sexuality. But behind the smile, the health of our teeth can have vast repercussions on our sexuality and the health of our reproductive organs. Teeth that have been neglected or improperly treated, or bad breath caused by bacteria, can certainly be unattractive and indicate poor vitality and specific illnesses.

The body’s vital force (also referred to as orgone, energy, chi, prana, etc.) and all aspects of our being and health are reflected in the teeth. So emotional well-being, good pelvic orgasmic energy, circulation, hormonal balance, nutritional supplementation and oral hygiene are interrelated factors. And with aging or a loss of vitality, the teeth and all their structures can go downhill quickly.

German doctors in the last century developed a theory that certain teeth relate to specific diseases, meridians, organs, hormones, spinal segments, joints, muscles, sense organs, etc. Similar “body maps” have been identified in other systems of medicine. For example, reflexology points for the entire body are found in the hands, feet and ears; acupuncture meridians also map out energy channels that relate to various organ systems; and nerve pathways from the spine create communication links throughout the body. Such energetic connections definitely include and affect sexuality. Drs. Voll, Kramer, Adler,

Gleditch, Rau and others found similar relationships and body maps in the mouth. These researchers developed charts to help practitioners relate dental disease to distant sites in the body. Many patients with cancers or other diseases of the reproductive organs, genital tract or breast have had decay, disease or root canals in corresponding teeth.

Symptoms of dental disease are headaches, neurological disorders (numbness, tingling, electrical currents in the face, head or extremities, visual disturbances), chronic sinus infections, facial pain (trigeminal neuralgia—tic douloureux), heart irregularities, panic, anxiety, depression, joint pain and most commonly, chronic fatigue—send a severe blow to the libido. No one is sexy when exhausted and the kidney/adrenal chi (energy) is gone.

Developing that Hollywood Smile

Diet is an important factor in an appealing smile. Weston Price, DDS, conducted a dental study at the beginning of the last century on the effect of diet. He visited aboriginal people, photographed their dental arches and noted their rate of tooth decay before and after going off their native diet and consuming refined foods and sugars. After two generations, the dental arch went from very wide jaws with perfect tooth alignment to narrow jaws with an awful array of crooked teeth. Decay rate went from one cavity for every 10 people to 10 cavities per person.

Nutrition also has a serious impact on the health of the gums and on the pleasantness of the breath. Bad breath has broken up many relationships and stopped others from ever getting started. It is a complex problem and can arise from several sources.

Chronically constipated people with leaky gut syndrome often have a strong fecal smell, which comes from the lungs. Streptococcusfecalis (which smells fecal) can also grow in the mouth. Infected gums and other periodontal illnesses are very common, especially with aging. Pockets and crypts that develop next to the teeth need attention before loss of teeth or bone occurs or extensive surgery and bone grafts become necessary.

Two-time Nobel Prize winner Dr. Linus Pauling felt that most humans suffer from sub-clinical scurvy. Scurvy (severe vitamin C deficiency) used to claim the lives of sailors on long voyages and Northern Europeans at the end of winter when fresh food ran out. Humans, primates and guinea pigs are the only animals that don’t make vitamin C in their liver:  A 150 pound goat makes about 14,000 mg. of vitamin C every day. The first symptoms of scurvy are bleeding and receding gums and loose teeth, which eventually fall out if not treated. Vitamin C is very important for connective tissue and maintaining strong capillary structure. Many doctors suggest patients take at least 5,000 mg of buffered vitamin C per day, a dose which heals numerous periodontal problems.

The father of Orthomolecular Psychiatry, Abram Hoffer, M.D., of Victoria, Canada, has researched many important uses of niacin (vitamin B3)—including the treatment of periodontal disease. Lack of sufficient niacin causes red blood cells to become stiff and inflexible. Capillaries, the body’s smallest blood vessels, are a third the size of the red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the tissues of the body. Adequate amounts of niacin assure red blood cell flexibility to let them fold into the capillaries and allow gum tissue to be oxygenated and repair normally. For people with deep pockets next to the teeth, treatment with a Water Pik with one drop of Citrotida P (grapefruit seed extract) in the reservoir helps to reduce infection and encourage healing. Vigorous brushing, good mineral intake and avoidance of sugar can all help to eliminate pockets that eventually cause loss of teeth and ongoing halitosis.

Most people faced with the prospect of straightening their smile are unaware that there are important choices in methods. Regular orthodontia—which waits until the child’s jaw has mostly matured and uses fixed bands and nickel-titanium wires to pull the teeth into position—can have many drawbacks. The bicuspid teeth are frequently removed to allow space for the teeth to be pulled into alignment, which can cause the jaw to collapse in later life. The torsion of the pull on the jaw can put unnatural stress on the head bones and cause headaches and personality changes. This method sets up strong electrical currents in the mouth, sometimes causing severe behavioral changes.

George Crozat, D.D.S., a New Orleans dentist who did most of his work from the 1920s – 1960s, developed a method of orthodontia that was much more connected to orthopedics (bone development). It uses a non-force technique in which gold wires of complex shapes are looped around the teeth to encourage the body to adopt new jaw alignment gently and gradually. He started the process much earlier in children, around the age of five or six, and widened the dental arch and jaw first to allow the teeth room to fit without removing them. Although it takes about a third longer than regular orthodontia, this method supports the lips and gives a beautiful Hollywood smile. It also can widen the dental arch of adults, which is generally not thought possible. The procedure requires extensive training and skill, but it is very worthwhile to find a dentist who can do it.

References:

1. George Meinig, DDS, Root Canal Cover-Up, 1993

2. Weston Price, DDS, The Price of Root Canals, 1994

3. Hal Huggins, DDS, It’s All In Your Head, 1985

4. Dietrich Klinghardt, MPH, PhD, Neural Therapy J Neurol Orthop. Med Surg 1993;14:109–14.

For more info, contact The Gerber Medical Clinic at 775-826-1900 or inge@gerbermedical.com.